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Thread: Conveying of Iron Ore Pellet

  1. #1
    BALAKRISHNAN.N Guest

    Conveying of Iron Ore Pellet

    I want to handle Iron Pellet of size 9-16 mm with bulk density of 1.91 t/cu.m. I would like to know whether this material can be handled at speed of more than 4 m/sec. using 800 & 1600 mm wide belts & what the max. speed and inclination suggested for the above belt widths?

  2. BALAKRISHNAN.N,

    1500mm wide belts running in excess of 5 m/s are being used to convey iron ore pellets in the US. Therefore, it is possible to run belts at over 4 m/s for iron ore pellets.

    As far as the maximum capacity and incline angles are concerned for your application - the answer to that is best obtained from the belt manufacturer and conveyor designer of your choice. Alternatively, you can use one of the design programs available (see previous postings).

    Regards,
    Dave Miller
    ADM Consulting
    10668 Newbury Ave., N.W.,
    Uniontown, Ohio 44685 USA
    Tel: 001 330 265 5881
    FAX: 001 330 494 1704
    E-mail: admconsulting@cs.com

  3. #3
    Lawrence K. Nordell

    Lawrence K. Nordell

    President and CEO

    Conveyor Dynamics Inc. [eDir]

    Conveyor Dynamics Inc.

    Professional Experience 58 Years / 8 Month Lawrence K. Nordell has 58 Years and 8 Month professional experience

    Discussions 2608 Lawrence K. Nordell acceded to 2608 discussions, Articles 0 Lawrence K. Nordell wrote 0 articles, Publications 0 Lawrence K. Nordell Nordell released 0 publications

    Searching nothing specified

    Know-How Design (1521) Lawrence K. Nordell used this tag 1521 times, Pipe Conveyor (238) Lawrence K. Nordell used this tag 238 times, Chutes (119) Lawrence K. Nordell used this tag 119 times

    Yes, iron ore pellets can be transported via belts running at greater than 4 m/s for a horizontally oriented flight. Belts width is only relevant to tonnage to be carried which you have not specified. The caveat to theabove is the chute.

    The transfer/loading chute must be correctly designed. A curved hood and spoon must centralize the load and place it on the belt near the belt speed and in the same direction as the receiving belt.

    Pellets can be pushed uphill on a very mild slope for a short length such as an elevated head pulley to transfer onto another belt. The problem will come when the tail end of the pellet feed goes up the incline and unsupported pellets rill back. The slope angle and length depends on the irregularity of the pelllet shape. If the pellets are near mable roundness then the ore will flow like water and virtually no incline greater than a few degrees is tolerable for more than a few meters. When the belt stops with pellets on the incline they will rill backward.

    The incline slope can be increased by cleating, cheveroning or making a flexwall of the belt carry surface. The pattern, dimensions, and shape of the belt surface will dictate the slope angle. Pellets will stack on top of each other provided the base layer is held stationary by the cleat system. Conservatively, you could incline the belt 10 degrees depending on belt sag and idler alignment disturbance using the cleats. you can do better with the flexwall system.

    The whole chute, belt surface, belt speed, material and incline slope selection process can be simulated using the Discrete Element (DEM) modeling.

    All of these points have restrictions with respect to belt tensions, pulley arrangements, .......

    We can provide the DEM design modeling of round or irregular shape pellets, chute and belt.

    Lawrence Nordell
    Conveyor Dynamics, Inc.
    www.conveyor-dynamics.com

  4. #4

    Conveying Iron Ore Pellets

    Iron ore pellets are not so difficult to handle. To facillitate handling is why iron ore is pelletized in the first place. Iron pellets can be, have been and are being conveyed at speeds above 4 m/s. Iron ore pellets also transfer well through chutework though wear is high and the pelletizing agglomerate (clay) can accumulate, cake up and compact in the valleys.

    Conveying angle is a problem with conventional open troughed conveyors, limited to about 10 degrees. Conveying angle is not a problem with sandwich belt type high angle conveyors. These have elevated iron ore pellets continously at rates above 10000 t/h at angles to 90 degrees. Such a system, the DSI Snake Sandwich high-angle conveyor uses all and only conventional conveyor equipment and components, including smooth surfaced rubber belts, that can be continuously scraped clean (cleated and pocket belts cannot be discharged completely or cleaned).

    I am surprised that previous commentators are not aware of the great success in elevating iron ore pellets from self-unloading ships with C-profiled sandwich belt conveyors.

    Please visit our website to learn more about DSI Snakes.

    Joseph A. Dos Santos, PE
    Dos Santos International
    531 Roselane St NW
    Suite 810
    Marietta, GA 30060
    USA
    Tel: 1 770 423 9895
    Fax 1 866 473 2252
    Email: jds@ dossantosintl.com
    Web Site: www.dossantosintl.com

  5. Joeseph Dos Santos is correct in stating that sandwich belt systems (Robbins Loop system, Continental Conveyor HAC, and DSI Snake) are used for the vertical lifting of iron ore in self-unloading ships at rates in excess of 5m/s. He is wrong, however, in assuming that I or Mr. Nordell are unaware of these systems.

    If the primary issue is one of conveyance angle over that normally available with flat belts, there are a number of options.
    But, I believe that this is getting away from the original question. If Mr. BALAKRISHNAN would indicate what his needs are a more focused discussion may be possible.

    Regards,
    Dave Miller
    ADM Consulting
    10668 Newbury Ave., N.W.,
    Uniontown, Ohio 44685 USA
    Tel: 001 330 265 5881
    FAX: 001 330 494 1704
    E-mail: admconsulting@cs.com

  6. #6

    Conveying Iron Ore Pellets

    Mr. Miller,

    My jab was prompted by Mr. Nordell's disertation on cleated belts and pocket belts while not mentioning the better solution.

    However, indeed conveying angle is an issue as stated by Mr. BALAKRISHNAN. And, the lower the allowed conventional angle the more is the cost advantage of the Sandwich conveyor system.

    I too am interested in the specifics so that they can be addressed with specific solutions rather than generalities.


    Joseph A. Dos Santos, PE
    Dos Santos International
    531 Roselane St NW
    Suite 810
    Marietta, GA 30060
    USA
    Tel: 1 770 423 9895
    Fax 1 866 473 2252
    Email: jds@ dossantosintl.com
    Web Site: www.dossantosintl.com

  7. #7
    Lawrence K. Nordell

    Lawrence K. Nordell

    President and CEO

    Conveyor Dynamics Inc. [eDir]

    Conveyor Dynamics Inc.

    Professional Experience 58 Years / 8 Month Lawrence K. Nordell has 58 Years and 8 Month professional experience

    Discussions 2608 Lawrence K. Nordell acceded to 2608 discussions, Articles 0 Lawrence K. Nordell wrote 0 articles, Publications 0 Lawrence K. Nordell Nordell released 0 publications

    Searching nothing specified

    Know-How Design (1521) Lawrence K. Nordell used this tag 1521 times, Pipe Conveyor (238) Lawrence K. Nordell used this tag 238 times, Chutes (119) Lawrence K. Nordell used this tag 119 times

    Dear Joe,

    Iron ore is pelletized to control the feed size to the furnace from finer and discordant size distribution which otherwise would not smelt properly.

    Yes, I can be held accountable for not being through and mentioning the sandwich class of belts. I apologize.

    Lawrence Nordell
    Conveyor Dynamics Inc.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 03
    Posts
    26

    Iron ore pellets

    MR. Balakrishnan,
    Our facility handles about 4.5 million short tons of iron ore pellets a year. Some of it is on a Continental conveyor HAC. Most of it is on conveyors of the size and speed you mention. We do have a conveyor that is steeper than 10 degrees and it does have a pellet spillage problem associated with it. It dates from the time when there was a sinter plant on the property, so it was not specifically designed for pellets. We run around 6000 to 8000 tons a day up that belt, and clean it up once per week. Key is to keep it running until it is empty, and not to stop it if possible with pellets on it.

    I don't know what manufacture of pellets you are looking at. If they are from North America, it is likely we have handled them.

    We currently operate 3 antiquated ore bridges with 15 ton buckets that pick up the pellets and drop them into hoppers over pan feeders. The pan feeders feed to a belt. They date from the days of raw ore. Yes, I know we should have replaced them years ago, that is why the US steel industry is going down the tubes, however, I am actively looking for a cost effective replacement to the pan feeders, due to high maintenance. It would seem to me that a vibratory feeder with a false bottom in the hopper would be a reasonable solution. We have had several suggestions for live feed belts to replace the pan feeder, but the prices seem far too high, ~$150,000 and more. Has anyone who is watching this forum ever done work like this before?

  9. #9

    Conveying Iron Ore Pellets

    Dear Hcrosmun

    Besides being the world's leading authority in sandwich belt high angle conveyors the writer has also designed belt feeders for the most severe applications including recieving face blasted copper ore and waste rock from 220 ton end dumptrucks and feeding this to the gyratory crusher. Traditionally such duties have been handled by apron feeders.

    From an operating and maintenance stand point a belt feeder is likely the best choice for your application.

    Call me if you are interested in pursuing this further.

    Joseph A. Dos Santos, PE
    Dos Santos International
    531 Roselane St NW
    Suite 810
    Marietta, GA 30060
    USA
    Tel: 1 770 423 9895
    Fax 1 866 473 2252
    Email: jds@ dossantosintl.com
    Web Site: www.dossantosintl.com

  10. Conveying of Iron Ore pellet

    From:
    KS Dilip
    Tecpro Systems (P) Ltd
    Chennai

    Sir,
    Please send the conveyor requirements to us for us to submit detailed specifcations and submit our technical and commercial offer.

    We have handled iropn ore pellets in many projects and can meet your requirements
    Regards

    KS Dilip

    Manager- Marketing
    Tecpro Systems (P) Ltd
    Chennai- 600020
    India
    Ph: +91 44 2442 5886/ 2442 6027
    Direct: +9144 2442 5965
    Fax: +9144 2442 5922
    Email: ksdilip@tecprosystems.com

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